CHALLENGE

In preparation for the highly-anticipated FDA approval of KYBELLA™, a first-and-only drug for reducing submental fullness (double chins), KYTHERA knew they had to navigate carefully. KYBELLA™ would be the first medical aesthetic injectable approved by the FDA since BOTOX and there was much that could go wrong – physicians misrepresenting KYBELLA™ or speaking off label, or media incorrectly positioning it as an obesity drug. KYTHERA needed to manage the message, spokespeople and images associated with KYBELLA™.
 

 

SOLUTION

To ensure success in launching KYBELLA™ in the US, the team:
• identified relevant trends (e.g., consumers identifying their double chin as their least favorite feature, growing demand for non-invasive solutions to feel more confident about one’s appearance)
• mapped key dermatology and plastic surgery influencers
• demonstrated drug safety and efficacy through a data milestone plan
• identified clinical trial patients to demonstrate their KYBELLA™ experience STRATEGY & TACTICS To control the message, the team employed a global media monitoring process to facilitate immediate correction of coverage.
 
The team also refreshed KYTHERA’s website, established an unbranded physician education program on submental fullness and held message trainings with key physician influencers, clinical trial physicians and patient and company spokespeople. Exclusive interviews were provided to top-tier outlets, including New York Times, Allure, Good Morning America, TODAY Show, The View, Wall Street Journal, and other bellwether media.
 

RESULTS

KYBELLA™ was the most successful drug approval to date in terms of media in 2015, generating:
• One billion media impressions, with more than 90% of stories including five or more positive messages
• Nearly 15% more coverage than any other brand in traditional media and 10% more than any brand in social media
• More coverage (70%) than the latest leading medical aesthetic product
• Unprecedented demand among physicians – a leading KOL praised “the best execution of an FDA approval and media coverage ever seen for a medical aesthetic product”